The Online Beacon

The Student News Site of Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

The Student News Site of Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

The Online Beacon

The Online Beacon

The Online Beacon

North Adams Weather


  • 1 PM
    54 °
  • 2 PM
    55 °
  • 3 PM
    55 °
  • 4 PM
    56 °
  • 5 PM
    55 °
  • 6 PM
    52 °
  • 7 PM
    48 °
  • 8 PM
    45 °
  • 9 PM
    43 °
  • 10 PM
    41 °
  • 11 PM
    39 °
  • 12 AM
    38 °
  • 1 AM
    38 °
  • 2 AM
    37 °
  • 3 AM
    36 °
  • 4 AM
    35 °
  • 5 AM
    34 °
  • 6 AM
    35 °
  • 7 AM
    38 °
  • 8 AM
    41 °
  • 9 AM
    45 °
  • 10 AM
    48 °
  • 11 AM
    51 °
  • 12 PM
    54 °
  • 1 PM
    56 °
April 16
56°/ 35°
Sunny
April 17
59°/ 32°
Partly Cloudy
April 18
43°/ 38°
Moderate rain
Advertisement
Advertisement

Exploring the Intersections of Ecology and Migration: “Unfortunately, It Was Paradise” Exhibition at MCLA

Exploring+the+Intersections+of+Ecology+and+Migration%3A+Unfortunately%2C+It+Was+Paradise+Exhibition+at+MCLA

From February 2nd to March 29th, 2024, MCLA is proud to present an evocative exhibition that delves into the entangled histories of ecology and migration. Featuring the works of artists Lorena Molina, Larissa Rogers, and Jumana Manna, this exhibition offers a profound exploration of the complexities surrounding these themes. The opening reception will be held on February 2nd from 5:00 to 8:00 pm, welcoming all to engage with the thought-provoking pieces on display.

Through a variety of mediums including painting, sculpture, and multimedia installations, Molina, Rogers, and Manna invite viewers to reconsider their understanding of ecology and migration. They navigate the intersections where ecology, memory, and migration converge, shedding light on the legacies of slavery, war, and settler colonialism that shape our world today.

Geographer Kathryn Yusoff’s observation, “Imperialism and ongoing (settler) colonialisms have been ending worlds for as long as they have been in existence,” serves as a poignant backdrop to the exhibition. It underscores the profound impact of historical forces on both the environment and human communities, urging viewers to confront uncomfortable truths.

While mainstream environmentalism often perpetuates systems of oppression, “Unfortunately, It Was Paradise” offers a different perspective. The artworks refract ecology as a site of intersectionality, recognizing the resilience and creativity of those in the diaspora who navigate and cultivate new forms of life within and beyond the confines of the nation-state.

Molina, Rogers, and Manna’s works provoke thought, spark conversation, and inspire empathy. From Molina’s evocative paintings depicting landscapes scarred by human intervention to Rogers’ intricate sculptures exploring the interconnectedness of ecosystems, each piece offers a unique perspective on the complex relationship between humanity and the natural world.

Moreover, the exhibition serves as a platform for dialogue and exchange. Through panel discussions, workshops, and artist talks, it provides a space for artists, scholars, and community members to come together and explore pressing issues facing our world today.

In hosting this exhibition, MCLA reaffirms its commitment to fostering a vibrant arts community and promoting dialogue around important social and environmental issues. By showcasing the work of Molina, Rogers, and Manna, the school invites students, faculty, and members of the wider community to engage critically with the themes presented and to consider their own role in shaping the world around them.

Don’t miss the opportunity to experience this thought-provoking exhibition at MCLA. Join us for the opening reception on February 2nd and immerse yourself in an exploration of ecology, migration, and the human experience.

For more information about the exhibition and related events, visit MCLA’s website or contact the MCLA Art Gallery.

Leave a Comment
More to Discover
About the Contributor
Karen Yamada, Staff Writer

Comments (0)

All The Online Beacon Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *